Archive | November, 2012

On women, political knowledge and Space Invaders

Why aren’t more people angry about women’s political under-representation? That was the core question posed by Joni Lovenduski in a recent article in Political Quarterly, reporting on a workshop on the subject. “Participants in the workshop”, Lovenduski noted, “wondered why the political under-representation of women in the United Kingdom is not treated as the public […]

Read More

Beveridge 70 Years On

On Tuesday I’ll be participating in Radio 4’s The State of Welfare. This marks the 70th anniversary of the publication of the Report of the Inter-Departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services – better known as the Beveridge Report, something that is generally regarded as laying the foundations of the post-war welfare state. The […]

Read More

The day Miliband came to visit…

David Miliband visited the University of Nottingham to take part in a Q&A session open for all students to ask whatever questions they wanted. @NottsPolitics and the audience tweeted along with the hashtag #UoNMiliband, so here’s a selection of the best tweets and photos.

Read More

What role does humanitarianism play in the world?

With complex humanitarian emergencies and natural disasters occurring with greater severity and frequency in various parts of the world, questions of humanitarianism – particularly how it should be conceived and practised – have become all the more relevant to our rapidly globalising world. In spite of conventional perspectives of humanitarianism as constituting a ‘universal’ value that transcends both time […]

Read More

Making republicans weep

This Thursday I am delivering the John Campbell Annual Lecture for Republic. During the early years of this century John Campbell helped build up Republic into the prominent and active campaigning group it is today, one whose aim is to replace the monarchy with an elected head of state. The Annual Lecture is Republic’s tribute […]

Read More

It’s not just the economy, stupid!

President Obama has secured another four years in the Whitehouse and the hopes of the Republicans have been dashed. Like elections in most countries, this was not decided by foreign policy issues but largely by domestic concerns, such as the state of the American economy and the issue of jobs. A pole conducted by Pew […]

Read More

Polling Observatory #19: British polling after the conference…and a look across the pond

This is the nineteenth in a series of posts that report on the state of the parties as measured by opinion polls. By pooling together all the available polling evidence we can reduce the impact of the random variation each individual survey inevitably produces. Most of the short term advances and setbacks in party polling […]

Read More

Time to take the political representation of the disabled seriously

              There are around ten million people with a disability in the UK but only a hand full in the House of Commons. How do we change this? And more to the point, why should we care? I looked at the issue for this week’s Sunday Politics (44 minutes in), […]

Read More

Galileo: another triumph for the EU?

                On 12 October 2012, two days before Felix Baumgartner’s free-fall jump from the stratosphere, and with considerably less publicity, a much more important event took place in space: two satellites of the ‘Galileo’ system were put into orbit. Galileo is a global navigation satellite system (similar to […]

Read More

Euro-phobia: Cameron’s chronic condition?

          There’s nothing exceptional about large rebellions – or even Commons defeats – like that seen last night in the House of Commons.  Every Prime Minister since Edward Heath has been defeated in the Commons at least once, as a result of their own MPs defying the government.  The problem for […]

Read More