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The Chinese ‘War on Terror’

  In Western media reports, the Western province of Xinjiang is always prefaced with the world “restive”. The region is roughly the same size as Western Europe, with a population of 22 million inhabitants, nine million of whom are members of the Turkic speaking Uighur ethnicity. Xinjiang literally translates as “new borders” and briefly achieved […]

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I’ll go wherever you May Gove

  Michael Gove and Theresa May are not the best of friends at the moment, according to a recent piece in The Guardian. Their falling out over the so-called ‘Trojan Horse’ row about alleged extremism in Birmingham schools apparently dates back to disagreements over the (then Labour) government’s ‘Preventing Violent Extremism’ strategy launched in the […]

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What if … John Smith had lived?

At 8.05am on 12 May 1994 – exactly 20 years ago – John Smith died during an early morning bath in his Barbican flat. He had suffered a second, massive heart attack. Smith’s death aged only 55 robbed the Labour party and the country of a likely Prime Minister. The outpouring of public grief in […]

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Competition: #GreatYouthEUDebate

Have something to say about Britain’s relationship with the EU? Interested in writing for the School’s political blog? We are giving students the opportunity to write for the School of Politics & International Relations blog “Ballots and Bullets” by entering the #GreatYouthEUDebate competition and we want YOU to get involved. Not only will it be […]

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“Proxy Warfare” By Andrew Mumford

Proxy wars represent a perennial strand in the history of conflict. The appeal of ‘warfare on the cheap’ has proved an irresistible strategic allure for nations through the centuries. However, proxy wars remain a missing link in contemporary war and security studies. In this timely book Andrew Mumford sheds new light on the dynamics and […]

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Major-General Tim Cross on Iraq: How did it get here and where is it going?

Major-General Tim Cross CBE was the most senior British officer in the building of the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq and now in retirement has become a military logistics expert. Here, Tim Cross gives us an overview of the military operations in Iraq over the last two decades and outlines his thoughts on what the […]

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AILSA MCKAY: 1963-2014

  Ailsa McKay was in the first cohort of students I taught as a novice lecturer at the University of Stirling in the mid-1980s.  Later, she became my first PhD student.   She completed research on her thesis – on a feminist case for a universal basic income – at Nottingham in the late 1990s.  Ailsa […]

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“Revolt on the Right” by Robert Ford and Matthew J. Goodwin.

  The first book to go on the new Ballots and Bullets section – The Bookshelf -, is Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain (Extremism and Democracy), written by Robert Ford and Matthew J. Goodwin. Published today, Revolt on the Right (which can be followed on Twitter @RevoltonRigh) focused on the UK Independence […]

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Ethnic autonomy in South Asia – a prelude to secession?

  Within South Asia in 2014, the states of Nepal and Burma/Myanmar are currently undergoing constitutional redesign and experiencing demands for recognition of territorially concentrated ethnic groups.  Similar demands are being made in Pakistan, with demands for Seriaki and Hazara speaking provinces receiving more support in recent years.  India is one presidential pen stroke away […]

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Ukraine and the Location of Effective Sovereign Power

  The protests and regime change in Ukraine have clearly captured the global imagination. Although the protests themselves had continued for quite some time, the brutal failed crackdown and sudden fall of President Yanukovich have thrust Ukraine into the spotlight. This post is intended to give a political theorist’s account of what the events can […]

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