Tag Archives: politics

“The Devil’s Long Tail: Religious and Other Radicals in the Internet Marketplace” by David Stevens and Kieron O’Hara

  The second must-read on The Bookshelf is “The Devil’s Long Tail: Religious and Other Radicals in the Internet Marketplace” by David Stevens and Kieron O’Hara. The internet may be a utopia for free expression, but it is also a haven for nihilistic groups and individuals spreading bizarre creeds unhindered by the risk-averse gatekeepers of the […]

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Telescoping Passive Revolution

As revealed on For the Desk Drawer earlier, an updated paperback edition of my book Revolution and State in Modern Mexico: The Political Economy of Uneven Development has now been published. A central proposition of the book is that the conditioning situation of uneven and combined development on a world scale — as the geographical expression of the contradictions […]

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Picturing Politics: Berlin by night

In the eleventh Picturing Politics Dr Anja Neundorf looks at an astronaut’s image of Berlin by night and what it reveals about German reunification. The image clearly shows a divide in the city’s lighting systems and this divide is also evident in the voting habits of East and West Berliners, 24 years after the fall […]

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80s nostalgia for the Labour victory of 1945

This post originally appeared on the Observing the 80s blog. In the wake of Labour’s disastrous 1983 campaign Tony Benn informed readers of the Guardian newspaper that despite appearances it was a great achievement, because, ‘for the first time since 1945, a political party with an openly socialist policy has received the support of over […]

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The impact of civil-military relations on Pakistan’s foreign policy

Assessing the role played by core decision-making bodies in Pakistan is interesting as the National Security Council (NSC) and the Defence Committee of the Cabinet (DCC) reflect the civil-military problematique that affects the country. The failure to establish a shared and effective decision-making mechanism is one of the factors, besides Indian military superiority, that led […]

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50 years after Macmillan retired, what can Cameron learn from ‘SuperMac’?

A slick Tory toff is Prime Minister. He struggles to maintain Britain’s status in the world, wrestles with disunity in his party, but seeks to win an election promoting a land of opportunity. I refer not to David Cameron, but to Harold Macmillan, who resigned as Prime Minister almost exactly 50 years ago. So how […]

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Top picks from the Margaret Thatcher Foundation archives

Yesterday Lady Gaga tweeted the imminent appearance of the artwork to the cover of her new album – for her fans 6pm could not come fast enough. In a similar way, some will have been on tenterhooks to hear just which Liberal Democrat got what mediocre job in the reshuffle. It can be funny what […]

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Making an impact: What hacks want from boffins

As the only boffin – defined as ‘anyone with a job in a university, a science GCSE or a labcoat’ – at last night’s launch of Rob Hutton’s new book on journalese, I spent much of the evening grafting at the academia-practitioner interface (there must be a grant for this…?). One conversation struck me in […]

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Cameron ‘determined to win’ debate on fracking: public opinion is moving in his favour

In a recent Daily Telegraph column, David Cameron says that ‘Fracking has become a national debate in Britain – and it’s one that I’m determined to win’. He means ‘win’, of course, in the sense of getting approval for the extraction of shale gas in the UK through the use of the controversial technique of […]

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Polling Observatory #27: Labour in crisis? Tories resurgent? Not really.

This is the twenty-seventh in a series of posts that report on the state of the parties as measured by opinion polls. By pooling together all the available polling evidence we can reduce the impact of the random variation each individual survey inevitably produces. Most of the short term advances and setbacks in party polling […]

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